Table of Contents

I. Prospectus
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II. Circles of Antagonism: Popular Culture
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III. Circles of Antagonism: The Intellectual Idiom
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IV. Causes of Antagonism
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V. Constructive Attitudinal Change
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VI. Structure of the Islamic World
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VII.Conspectus
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Appendices
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Afterword by Javeed Akhter
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About the Author

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About the Author

The Institute is fortunate to have its first position paper written by so distinguished a scholar as Dr. Ralph Braibanti, James B. Duke Professor of Political Science Emeritus at Duke University. Before joining the Duke faculty in 1953, Professor Braibanti taught at Kenyon College and served as assistant director of the American Political Science Association in Washington, D.C. During World War II he was a military government officer in the occupation of Japan.

From 1960 to 1962 he was advisor to the Civil Service Academy of Pakistan. His studies of the judicial and administrative systems of Pakistan have been widely acclaimed. The government of Pakistan in 1987 published a collection of his writings under the title Evolution of Pakistan's Administrative System The Collected Papers of Ralph Braibanti. He is the author of more than a hundred major scholarly articles and several books including Research on the Bureaucracy of Pakistan; and is editor and co-author of Administration and Economic Development in India; Asian Bureaucratic Systems Emergent from the British Imperial Tradition; Pakistan: the Long View; Tradition, Values and Socio-Economic Development, and Political and Administrative Development. Subsequently he served as Ford Foundation consultant in Lebanon and Saudi Arabia, U.N. consultant in Malaysia, UNESCO consultant in Morocco, World Bank consultant on Bangladesh and visiting professor at the University of Kuwait.

In 1989 he was appointed King Faisal Distinguished International Lecturer in Islamic Affairs by the Arab-American Affairs Council (now the Middle East Policy Council).

At Duke University he established the program in Islamic and Arabian Development Studies and was its director until his retirement in 1990. He was awarded the Alumni Distinguishing Teaching Award and the Student Body's Designation as Distinguished Teacher. He received the Ph.D. degree from Syracuse University, and holds the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters from Western Connecticut State University where he was an undergraduate.

J.A.