Table of Contents

Abbreviations Used in the Essay
-
Foreword: Dr. John O Voll
-
Editor's Note: Sabreen Akhter
-
Acknowledgments
-
Objectives of the Review
-
Attitudes towards Prophet Muhammad
-
I. The Seeker of Truth
-
II. The Recipient of the Mantle of Prophethood/ The Warner and the Exhorter
-
III. The Stoic Optimist
-
IV. The Pluralistic Leader
-
V. The Courageous Yet Reluctant Warrior
-
VI. The Statesman par excellence and the Teacher
-
VII. The Compassionate Ruler and Spiritual Leader
-
Does this essay cover any new ground?
-
Appendices
-
The Sources for This Essay

Back to ISPI Home
 

Abbreviations used in this essay and the citation of the Qur'anic verses

It is conventional for Muslim writers to use certain terms of respect and endearment when addressing the Prophet Muhammad, his companions and other Prophets. This is part of the Muslim etiquette or Adab, which may be defined as the genteel culture, which evolved over centuries and became universally accepted and practiced over the entire Muslim world. Adab informs the social pattern of Muslims, including conversation, ways of interacting with elders and each other, the use of literature, and dress code among other things. The use of these terms of respect does not prevent the scholar from being objective in his analysis or when necessary, being appropriately critical. However it requires him to do so in a respectful manner, keeping a fair and balanced perspective, and making sure that the critique is honest and constructive. The following is a listing of symbols used in this book for the various terms of respect.
Subhanahu wa Ta'ala (SWT): Glory to him the Most Hight; used with the name of Allah, or God.
Salla Allahu Alayhi wa Sallam (S): We pray that peace and blessings be upon him used with the Prophet Muhammad's name.
Alayh as-Salam (A): Peace be upon him; used for all other Prophets.
The reader should assume that whenever the companions of the Prophet are mentioned it is the intent of the writer to use the phrase May Allah be pleased with him/her. The phrase is omitted only for better flow of the text.
I have also decided to give the citation of the Qur'anic verses in the body of the text rather than in the footnotes for both better rhetorical flow and easier verification.